Readings
Programming Systems & Languages

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readings>

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2008-08-28 -17:27 -0700

see also:
Readings in Software Tools
Readings in Software Engineering
Readings in Computer Science
Readings in Functional Programming Systems (Miser Project)

[Barker2000]
Barker, Jacquie.  Beginning Java Objects.  Wrox Press (Birmingham, UK: 2000).  ISBN 1-861004-17-6 pbk.
     Another way to become involved in Java as an object-oriented programming system is to start from object-oriented design and see how to develop programs from there.  That's the approach of this book.  It's an alternative way to come at Java instead of beginning with the basic programming-language approach.
   Content
     About the Author
     Acknowledgments
     Introduction

     Part I: The ABC's of Objects
     1. A Little Taste of Java
     2. Abstraction and
Modeling
     3. Objects and Classes
     4. Object Interactions
     5. Relationships Between Objects
     6. Collections of Objects
     7. Some Final Concepts
     Part II: Object
Modeling
     8. The Object
Modeling Process in a Nutshell
     9. Formalizing Requirements through Use Cases
     10. Modeling the Static / Data Aspects of the System
     11. Modeling the Dynamic / Behavioral Aspects of the System
     12. Wrapping Up Our Modeling Efforts
     Part III: Translating an Object 'Blueprint' into Java Code
     13. A Deeper Look At Java
     14. Transforming Your Model into Java Code
     15. Rounding Out Your Application, Part 1 - Adding File Persistence
     16. Rounding Out Your Application, Part 2 - Adding a Graphical User Interface
     17. Next Steps
     Part IV: Appendices
     Appendix A: Suggestions for Using This Book as a Textbook
     Appendix B: Alternative Case Studies
     Appendix C: Setting Up a Basic Object Modeling / Java Environment
     Appendix D: SRS Source Code
     Appendix E: Note to Experienced C++ Programmers
     Appendix F: How Polymorphism Works
     Appendix G: Support, Errata and p2p.wrox.com
     Index
   
[Bates2003]
Sierra, Kathy., Bates, Bert.  Head First Java.  O'Reilly (Sebastapol, CA: 2003).  ISBN 0-596-00465-6 pbk.  See [Sierra2003]
   
[Bracha2000]
Joy, Bill (ed.)., Steele, Guy L.,Jr., Gosling, James., Bracha, Gilad.  Java Language Specification.  2.ed.   Addison-Wesley (Boston: 2000).  ISBN 0-201-31008-2 pbk.  See [Joy2000]
   
[Brogden1999]
Brogden, Bill.  Java 2 Exam CramCoriolis (Scottsdale, AZ: 1999).  ISBN 1-57610-291-2 pbk.
     I have begun to notice that certification-preparation materials have a certain to-the-point, no frills quality that is welcome.  Although I would like to provide something else for mastery of Java inside-out, I also want to make sure that I don't miss anything that matters for certification.   If I present anything that is contrary or contrasting, I will need to behave responsibly with respect to what Sun thinks is important to be known for Java developers to be skilled.  I picked this book up some time ago, knowing that I would be studying Java at some point.  Now that I am, I need to account for this book and others like it that seem to provide a compact view of Java 2.   The certification process is constantly being revised and updated for different levels of Java.  This book is current for JDK 1.2, and there are many changes for the current JDK 1.4 level (and JDK 1.5 is reportedly on its way). See also [Glass2001] -- dh:2003-07-17
   Content
     About the Author
     Acknowledgments
     Introduction
     Self-Assessment

     1. Java and the Sun Certification Test
     2. Language Fundamentals
     3. Java Operators with Primitives and Objects
     4. Creating Java Classes
     5. Nested Classes
     6. Converting and Casting Primitives and Objects
     7. Flow Control and Exceptions
     8. Working with Java Classes and Objects
     9. Java Threads
     10. Standard Library Utility Classes
     11. The Java AWT Components
     12.
Building GUIs with the AWT Components
     13. The Java Event Model
     14. Java IO
     15. Sample Test
     16. Answer Key
     Glossary
     Index

   
[Campione2001]
Campione, Mary., Walrath, Kathy., Huml, Alison.  The Java Tutorial: A Short Course on the Basics. ed.3.  Addison-Wesley (Boston, MA: 2001).  ISBN 0-201-70393-9 alk. paper 580pp plus CD-ROM.
    
2003-02-11: The Java Tutorial on the web is an extremely useful site.  Sometimes more useful than any of the books I have on Java.  I discovered that in a course where we were talking about programming-language and design principles, and I could not answer basic questions about Java or reconcile the desirability and validity of examples I wanted to express.  The Java Tutorial answered my questions about components and frameworks where other materials have no idea what the point of the interface and implements keywords is.  So I was delighted to find that there is book version   And the CD-ROM has all three books in this series as well as current releases (up through Java 2 SE 1.3 Runtime and Platform).  The on-line Java Tutorial should still be consulted for specialized and advanced topics, especially the treatment of frameworks.  And this book is going to be my guide to tuning up my Java skills.
     Later versions of the on-line version, including content that is only available on the Web, is found at the Java Tutorial download page.  The CD-ROM version includes The Java Tutorial Continued, and The JFC Swing Tutorial, also available on-line and in book form.  Any way you obtain it, the Collections tutorial is worth the price of admission, since it provides a worked case of a component framework and demonstrates the power of the framework approach.  (This is not new news to Microsoft COM developers, but its exploitation directly in a programming system is a valuable step.) 
   Content
     Preface
     1. Getting Started
     2. Object-Oriented Programming Concepts
     3. Language Basics
     4. Object Basics and Simple Data Objects
     5. Classes and Inheritance
     6. Interfaces and Packages
     7. Handling Errors Using Exceptions
     8. Threads: Doing Two or More Tasks at Once
     9. I/O Reading and Writing
     10. User Interfaces That Swing
     Appendix A.  Common Problems and Their Solutions
     Appendix B.  Internet-Ready Applets
     Appendix C.  Collections
     Appendix D.  Deprecated Thread Methods
     Appendix E.  Reference
     Index
   
[Deitel2003]
Deitel, Harvey M., Deitel, Paul JJava How to Program.  ed.5.  Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ: 2003).  ISBN 0-13-101621-0 pbk + CD-ROM.
     This text is used for the University of Liverpool on-line M.Sc in IT Object-Oriented Programming with Java course having modules commencing on 2003-05-29.
     Resources in support of the book are available at
http://www.deitel.com/books/downloads.html.  Current materials include content and samples from the book, files for all of the programming examples (also on the CD-ROM), an errata link (none so far), slides for lectures, and a FAQ plus instructions on installing Java for use with the course.
     The CD-ROM does not contain the 1447-page text, but the software setup is nicely done (with the strictest limitations for platform being for the Sun One IDE, which is not required).  The CD-ROM software has been verified on Windows and Linux (RedHat 7.2), and includes additional references on XML, CSS, and XHTML that are useful in conjunction with the text.  The support material is very clear and pleasantly done.  There are also links to appropriate installation tutorials and confirmation examples at Sun's java site. -- dh:2003-05-24
   Content
     Preface
     1. Introduction to Computers, the Internet and the Web
     2. Introduction to Java Applications
     3. Introduction to Java Applets
     4. Control Statements: Part 1
     5. Control Statements: Part 2
     6. Methods
     7. Arrays
     8. Object-Based Programming
     9. Object-Oriented Programming: Inheritance
     10. Object-Oriented Programming: Polymorphism
     11. Strings and Characters
     12. Graphics and Java2D
     13. Graphical User Interface Components: Part 1
     14. Graphical User Interface Components: Part 2
     15. Exception Handling
     16. Multithreading
     17. Files and Streams
     18. Networking
     19. Multimedia: Images, Animation and Audio
     20. Data Structures
     21. Java Utilities Package and Bit Manipulation
     22. Collections
     23. Java Database Connectivity with JDBC
     24. Servlets
     25. JavaServer Pages (JSP)
     Appendices
     A. Operator Precedence Chart
     B. ASCII Character Set
     C. Number Systems
     D. Elevator Events and Listener Interfaces
     E. Elevator Model
     F. Elevator View (on CD)
     G. Unicode
     Bibliography
     Index
   
[ECMA262-1d999]
ECMA InternationalECMAScript Language Specification, ed.3.  Standard ECMA-262.  ECMA (Geneva: December, 1999).  Available on-line in PDF format.
   Content

    Brief History
     1. Scope
     2. Conformance
     3. References
     4. Overview
     5. Notational Conventions
     6. Source Text
     7. Lexical Conventions
     8. Types
     9. Type Conversion
     10. Execution Contexts
     11. Expressions
     12. Statements
     13. Function Definition
     14. Program
     15. Native ECMAScript Objects
     16. Errors
     Annex A - Grammar Summary
     Annex B - Compatibility
    
[Felleisen1998]
Felleisen, Matthias., Friedman, Daniel P.  A Little Java, A Few Patterns.  Foreword by Ralph E. Johnson.  MIT Press (Cambridge, MA: 1998).  ISBN 0-262-56115-8 pbk: alk. paper.
     "Learning to program is more than learning the syntactic and semantic rules of a programming language.  It also requires learning how to design programs.  Any good book on programming must therefore teach program design. ...
     "Felleisen and Freidman show that the functional (input-output driven) method of program design naturally leads to the use of well-known object-oriented design patterns.  In fact, they integrate the two styles seamlessly and show how well they work together.  Their book proves that the functional design method does not clash with, but supports object-oriented programming." -- from the Foreword, p.ix.
     I ordered this book because I became distressed over how Java was being taught.  My colleague, BAnd, recommended this to me.  I am not sure why.  The book is a mystery.  I intend to unlock it.
     This book would not, on first glance, appear to be about Java in any recognizable way.  It uses java in ways that don't make sense in the ordinary course of Java programming or the teaching of programming with Java.  And the patterns that are used are not explained, they are experienced.  
     The thing to do is try these out.  It won' t make any sense otherwise.  And it appears to provide some very powerful patterns of an applicative nature. -- dh:2003-07-17
   Content
     Foreword
     Preface
     Experimenting with Java

     1. Modern Toys [basic data types and defined types]
     2. Methods to Our Madness [abstract and variant methods]
     3. What's New? [functional composition and manipulation of objects]
     4. Come to Our Carousel [datatype classes interacting with functions-on-datatypes (classes)]
     5. Objects Are People, Too [sort of about polymorphism]
     6. Boring Protocols [sort of about interfaces, and protocols]
     7. Oh, My! [sort of about over-riding methods]
     8. Like Father, Like Son
     9. Be a Good Visitor
     10. The State of Things to Come
     Commencement
     Index

[Flanagan2002]
Flanagan, David. JavaScript: The Definitive Guide. ed.4. O'Reilly (Sebastabol, CA: 1996, 1997, 1998, 2002). ISBN 0-596-00048-0 pbk.
     A very clean description, with emphasis on client-side (browser-hosted) ECMAScript 3 implementations. There is an errata for the book and all of the examples can be downloaded over the Web. I recommend this book for its treatment of Core JavaScript. [ECMA262-1999] goes deeper, and [Wyke2002] deals with a greater variety of host cases and host objects.  dh:2003-05-30.
   Content
     Preface
     1. Introduction to JavaScript
     Part I. Core JavaScript
     2. Lexical Structure
     3. Data Types and Values
     4. Variables
     5. Expressions and Operators
     6. Statements
     7. Functions
     8. Objects
     9. Arrays
     10. Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions
     11. Further Topics in JavaScript
     Part II. Client-Side JavaScript
     12. JavaScript in Web Browsers
     13. Windows and Frames
     14. The Document Object
     15. Forms and Form Elements
     16. Scripting Cookies
     17. The Document Object Model
     18. Cascading Style Sheets and Dynamic HTML
     19. Events and Event Handling
     20. Compatibility Techniques
     21. JavaScript Security
     22. Using Java with JavaScript
     Part III. Core JavaScript Reference
     Part IV. Client-Side JavaScript Reference
     Part V. W3C DOM Reference
     Part VI. Class, Property, Method, and Event Handler Index
     Index
   
[Friedman1998]
Felleisen, Matthias., Friedman, Daniel P.  A Little Java, A Few Patterns.  Foreword by Ralph E. Johnson.  MIT Press (Cambridge, MA: 1998).  ISBN 0-262-56115-8 pbk: alk. paper.  See [Felleisen1998]
   
[Gilliam2002]
Wyke, R.Allen., Gilliam, Jason D., Ting, Charlton., Michaels, Sean.  Pure JavaScript, ed.2.  Sams (Indianapolis, IN: 2002).  ISBN 0-672-32141-6 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Wyke2002]
   
[Glass2001]
Glass, Cindy., Griscti, Jane., Isayeva, Margarita., Kallambella, Ajith., Sierra, Kathy.  Mike Meyers' Java 2 Certification Passport (Exam 310-025)Osborne/McGraw-Hill (Berkeley, CA: 2001).  ISBN 0-07-219366-2 pbk + CD-ROM.
     This examination guide is more recent than [Brogden1999] and differently organized.  This provides an alternative viewpoint that is useful in ensuring coverage and also providing expanded perspective on topics of interest.  Concerns I have on initial perusal is (1) the version of Java SDK is not stated and (2) I found a bogus examination tip (I hope not to a bogus examination question) by page 7.  Another reason to consult more than one guide.  -- dh:2003-07-17.
   Content
     About the Authors
     Dedication
     Check-In
     I.
Basic Language Rules and OOP Concepts
          1. Language Fundamentals
          2. Declarations and Access Control
          3. Overloading, Overriding, Runtime Type, and Object Orientation
          4. Garbage Collection
          5. The java.lang package
     II. Java in Practice
          6. Operators and Assignment
          7. Flow Control
          8. Threads
     III. Using the Java API
          9. AWT 1: The User Interface
          10. AWT 2: Making the Screen Work
          11. java.io Package
          12. The java.util Package
     Appendix A: About the CD-ROM
     Appendix B: Career Flight Path
   
[Gosling2000]
Joy, Bill (ed.)., Steele, Guy L.,Jr., Gosling, James., Bracha, Gilad.  Java Language Specification.  2.ed.   Addison-Wesley (Boston: 2000).  ISBN 0-201-31008-2 pbk.  See [Joy2000]
   
[Griscti2001]
Glass, Cindy., Griscti, Jane., Isayeva, Margarita., Kallambella, Ajith., Sierra, Kathy.  Mike Meyers' Java 2 Certification Passport (Exam 310-025).  Osborne/McGraw-Hill (Berkeley, CA: 2001).  ISBN 0-07-219366-2 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Glass2001]
   
[Halloway2002]
Halloway, Stuart Dabbs.  Component Development for the Java Platform.  Addison-Wesley (Boston: 2002).  ISBN 0-201-75306-5 pbk.  Foreword by Don Box.
     This is an important book. It looks at the integration mechanisms around Java, and how interoperability with components from other sources can be accomplished.  It provides essential information for establishing component frameworks and delivering implementation into those frameworks.  And it is an opening for access to heterogeneous implementations, all managed and integrated under component interfaces.  This is a nuts-and-bolts description of integration support that can be adapted to new component integrations.   
   Content
     Foreword [Don Box]
     Preface
     1. From Objects to Components
     2. The Class Loader Architecture
     3. Type Information and Reflection
     4. Serialization
     5. Customizing Class Loading
     6. Interop 1: JNI
     7. Generative Programming
     8. Onward
     Appendix A. Interop2: Bridging Java and Win32/COM
     Index
   
[Horton2002]
Horton, Ivor.  Beginning Java 2.  SDK 1.4 edition.  Wrox (Birmingham, UK: 2002).  ISBN 1-861005-69-5 pbk.
     An alternative to [Deitel2003] that might provide different perspective and be helpful in clarifying some point by providing an alternative explanation and perspective.  Another fine approach is to make use of The Java Tutorial [Campione2001] and its on-line supplements. Although there is no companion CD-ROM to this book, there are adequate web resources.  
   Content
     Introduction
     1. Introducing Java
     2. Programs, Data, Variables and Calculation
     3. Loops and Logic
     4. Arrays and Strings
     5. Defining Classes
     6. Extending Classes and Inheritance
     7. Exceptions
     8. Understanding Streams
     9. Accessing Files and Directories
     10. Writing Files
     11. Reading Files
     12. Serializing Objects
     13. Collection Classes
     14. A Collection of Useful Classes
     15. Threads
     16. Creating Windows
     17. Handling Events
     18. Drawing in a Window
     19. Extending the GUI
     20. Filing and Printing Documents
     21. Java and XML
     22. Creating and Modifying XML Documents
     Appendix A: Keywords
     Appendix B: Computer Arithmetic
     Index of Data Types, Keywords and Operators
     Index of Classes, Exceptions, Interfaces and Methods
     Main Index

   
[Huml2001]
Campione, Mary., Walrath, Kathy., Huml, Alison.  The Java Tutorial: A Short Course on the Basics. ed.3.  Addison-Wesley (Boston, MA: 2001).  ISBN 0-201-70393-9 alk. paper 580pp plus CD-ROM.  See [Campione2001]
 
[Isayeva2001]
Glass, Cindy., Griscti, Jane., Isayeva, Margarita., Kallambella, Ajith., Sierra, Kathy.  Mike Meyers' Java 2 Certification Passport (Exam 310-025).  Osborne/McGraw-Hill (Berkeley, CA: 2001).  ISBN 0-07-219366-2 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Glass2001]
   
[Johnson1998b]
Felleisen, Matthias., Friedman, Daniel P.  A Little Java, A Few Patterns.  Foreword by Ralph E. Johnson.  MIT Press (Cambridge, MA: 1998).  ISBN 0-262-56115-8 pbk: alk. paper.  See [Felleisen1998]
   
[Joy2000]  
Joy, Bill (ed.)., Steele, Guy L.,Jr., Gosling, James., Bracha, Gilad.  Java Language Specification.  2.ed.   Addison-Wesley (Boston: 2000).  ISBN 0-201-31008-2 pbk.
     Sometimes, the only thing to do is go to the specification of a language to determine what its essential features are, as opposed to the accidental ones exposed by an implementation and the general underspecified way that the language may be presented in textbooks and introductory materials.  The language specification is also available on the web in a variety of electronic forms, and can be found in print form as well.  There is also on-line maintenance information on the language. -- dh:2003-05-24
   Content
     Preface
     Preface to the Second Edition

     1. Introduction
     2. Grammars
     3. Lexical Structure
     4. Types, Values, and Variables
     5. Conversions and Promotions
     6. Names
     7. Packages
     8. Classes
     9. Interfaces
     10. Arrays
     11. Exceptions
     12. Execution
     13. Binary Compatibility
     14. Blocks and Statements
     15. Expressions
     16. Definite Assignment
     17. Threads and Locks
     18. Syntax
     Index
    
[Kallambella2001]
Glass, Cindy., Griscti, Jane., Isayeva, Margarita., Kallambella, Ajith., Sierra, Kathy.  Mike Meyers' Java 2 Certification Passport (Exam 310-025).  Osborne/McGraw-Hill (Berkeley, CA: 2001).  ISBN 0-07-219366-2 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Glass2001]
   
[Michaels2002]
Wyke, R.Allen., Gilliam, Jason D., Ting, Charlton., Michaels, Sean.  Pure JavaScript, ed.2.  Sams (Indianapolis, IN: 2002).  ISBN 0-672-32141-6 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Wyke2002]
   
[Mueller2002]
Mueller, John Paul.  .NET Framework Solutions: In Search of the Lost Win32 API.  SYBEX (Alameda, CA: 2002).  ISBN 0-7821-4134-X pbk + CD-ROM.
     This book deals with access to the underlying platform from within .NET languages, such as C#.  The availability of C++ as a way to operate unmanaged and also to provide bridges from the platform to the managed environment is also pointed out.  There is also clear identification of how C# can be used to access underlying platform libraries and other features via its attribute construct.
   
[Sierra2001]
Glass, Cindy., Griscti, Jane., Isayeva, Margarita., Kallambella, Ajith., Sierra, Kathy.  Mike Meyers' Java 2 Certification Passport (Exam 310-025).  Osborne/McGraw-Hill (Berkeley, CA: 2001).  ISBN 0-07-219366-2 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Glass2001]
   
[Sierra2003]
Sierra, Kathy., Bates, Bert.  Head First Java.  O'Reilly (Sebastapol, CA: 2003).  ISBN 0-596-00465-6 pbk.
     I've been looking for alternative resources to recommend to people who want to get started in Java at whatever level.  This book sounded good and I ordered it based on reviews on amazon.com.  Then I saw it in a book store and feared I'd made a big mistake.  Cartoons, silliness, and maybe superficiality.  Well, my copy arrived and I started turning the pages.  This books a hoot!  And so far, all of the advice is admirable and to the point. -- dh:2003-07-18.
   Content
     Perpetrators of the Head First Java book
     Intro

     1. Breaking the Surface: a quick dip
     2. A Trip to Objectville: yes, there will be objects
     3. Know Your Variables: primitives and references
     4. How Objects Behave: object state effects method behavior
     5. Extra-Strength Methods: flow control, operations, and more
     6. Using the Java Library: so you don't have to write it all yourself
     7. Better Living in Objectville: planning for the future
     8. Serious Polymorphism: exploiting abstract classes and interfaces
     9. Life and Death of an Object: constructors and memory management
     10. Numbers Matter: math, formatting, wrappers, and statics
     11. Risky Behavior: exception handling
     12. A Very Graphic Story: intro to GUI, event handling, and inner classes
     13. Work on Your Swing: layout managers and components
     14. Saving Objects: serialization and I/O
     15. Make a Connection: networking sockets and multithreading
     16. Release Your Code: packaging and deployment
     17. Distributed Computing: RMI with a dash of servlets, EJB, and Jini
     Appendix A: Final code kitchen
     Appendix B: Top Ten Things that didn't make it into the rest of the book
     Index
   
[Steele2000]
Joy, Bill (ed.)., Steele, Guy L.,Jr., Gosling, James., Bracha, Gilad.  Java Language Specification.  2.ed.   Addison-Wesley (Boston: 2000).  ISBN 0-201-31008-2 pbk.  See [Joy2000]
   
[Stroustrop2000]
Stroustrop, Bjarne. The C++ Programming Language. Special edition. Addison-Wesley (Reading, MA: 1985, 1991, 2000). ISBN 0-201-70073-5.
   Content
     Preface
     Preface to Second Edition
     Preface to First Edition
     Introductory Material

          1. Notes to the Reader
          2. A Tour of C++
          3. A Tour of the Standard Library
     Part I: Basic Facilities
          4. Types and Declarations
          5. Pointers, Arrays, and Structures
          6. Expressions and Statements
          7. Functions
          8. Namespaces and Exceptions
          9. Source Files and Programs
     Part II: Abstraction Mechanisms
          10. Classes
          11. Operator Overloading
          12. Derived Classes
          13. Templates
          14. Exception Handling
          15. Class Hierarchies
     Part III: The Standard Library
          16. Library Organization and Containers
          17. Standard Containers
          18. Algorithms and Function Objects
          19. Iterators and Allocators
          20. Strings
          21. Streams
          22. Numerics
     Part IV: Design Using C++
          23. Development and Design
          24. Design and Programming
          25. Roles of Classes
     Appendices
          A. The C++ Grammar
          B. Compatibility
          C. Technicalities
          D. Locales
          E. Standard Library Exception Safety
     Index
   
[Ting2002]
Wyke, R.Allen., Gilliam, Jason D., Ting, Charlton., Michaels, Sean.  Pure JavaScript, ed.2.  Sams (Indianapolis, IN: 2002).  ISBN 0-672-32141-6 pbk + CD-ROM.  See [Wyke2002]
   
[VanLaningham2000]
Van Laningham, Ivan. Sams Teach Yourself Python in 24 Hours. Sams Publishing (Indianapolis: 2000). ISBN 0-672-31735-4.
     2000-07-18: I am starting to lose interest in Python for now. This is the closest to a good beginner book that is available.
     2003-08-10: I suppose I should explain myself.  On confirming that Python objects are basically unsafe, I lost interest in Python and went looking for a system where objects start out being inherently stable and well-defined.  In particular, I want a system where an interface I pass an object to can't hack my object and inplant spyware or other artifacts not of my choosing and not in the awareness of the user who loves Python for its programming model without being aware of the underlying object architecture.  Now, it happens that ECMAScript has the same pitfall, but people don't have the pretensions about ECMAScript (in any circles I travel in) compared to the aspirations that people have for Python.  It is also easier to treat the ECMAScript case.  Java is still closer to what I have in mind, though I am disturbed that a component can (easily?) violate the contract of its interface for using other interfaces by getting its hands on the implementation behind a supplied interface.  That leaves COM as the safest component framework that I can confirm right now.  I don't know about the CLI and C# yet.  
   
[Walrath2001]
Campione, Mary., Walrath, Kathy., Huml, Alison.  The Java Tutorial: A Short Course on the Basics. ed.3.  Addison-Wesley (Boston, MA: 2001).  ISBN 0-201-70393-9 alk.paper 580pp plus CD-ROM.  See [Campione2001]
   
[Wyke2002]
Wyke, R.Allen., Gilliam, Jason D., Ting, Charlton., Michaels, Sean.  Pure JavaScript, ed.2.  Sams (Indianapolis, IN: 2002).  ISBN 0-672-32141-6 pbk + CD-ROM.
     It has come to my attention that JavaScript has become ubiquitous for scripting.  It works on Web servers, it works in browsers, and it works on a variety of platforms, including Windows, Linux, Java, and .NET.  There are Java-friendly and COM-friendly versions.  Generally, this little language is showing great power and endurance, without attracting much attention at all.  And, in its ECMAscript incarnation, JavaScript has an open, public specification maintained by a standards body.  
     This book weighs in at over 1500 pages, not counting the additional 600 pages that are only on the CD-ROM. The entire text of the book is also on the CD-ROM, so you won't need a separate suitcase just to travel with the book. -- dh:2003-05-25
     As valuable as I find this book for its coverage of the different ways that ECMAScript is implemented, and those implementations are hosted, the treatment of Core JavaScript in [Flanagan2002] is recommended for its clean approach.  For depth and clarity of the core concepts, the ECMA International standard is ideal [ECMA262-1999]. -- dh:2003-05-30
   Content
     About the Authors
     Dedications
     Acknowledgments
     Tell Us What You Think!
     Introduction
     Part I: A Programmer's Overview of JavaScript
          1. What Is JavaScript to a Programmer?
          2. Details of the Language
     Part II: Programming in JavaScript
          3. Programming Techniques
          4. Client-Side Scripting
          5. JavaScript on the Server-Side
          6. Windows Scripting
     Part III: JavaScript Reference
          7. Core Language
          8. Client-Side
          9. Server-Side
     Index
     CD-ROM
          10. DOM Core
          11. DOM HTML
          12. DOM Events
          13. DOM CSS
          14. JScript RunTime
          15. Windows Script Host

 


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